Proclamation of Korean Independence
This is the translated text, signed by Korean 33 patriots.[6] It was read on the morning of March 1, 1919, at Tapgol Park in Seoul, and in the afternoon at many
other places throughout Korea.

We herewith proclaim the independence of Korea and the liberty of the Korean people. We tell it to the world in witness of the equality of all nations and we
pass it on to our posterity as their inherent right.

We make this proclamation, having back of us 5,000 year of history, and 20,000,000 of a united loyal people. We take this step to insure to our children for all
time to come, personal liberty in accord with the awakening consciousness of this new era. This is the clear leading of God, the moving principle of the
present age, the whole human race's just claim. It is something that cannot be stamped out, or stifled, or gagged, or suppressed by any means.

Victims of an older age, when brute force and the spirit of plunder ruled, we have come after these long thousands of years to experience the agony of ten
years of foreign oppression, with every loss to the right to live, every restriction of the freedom of thought, every damage done to the dignity of life, every
opportunity lost for a share in the intelligent advance of the age in which we live.

Assumedly, if the defects of the past are to be rectified, if the agony of the present is to be unloosed, if the future oppression is to be avoided, if thought is to
be set free, if right of action is to be given a place, if we are to attain to any way of progress, if we are to deliver our children from the painful, shameful
heritage, if we are to leave blessing and happiness intact for those who succeed us, the first of all necessary things is the clear-cut independence of our
people. What cannot our twenty millions do, every man with sword in heart, in this day when human nature and conscience are making a stand for truth and
right?

What barrier can we not break, what purpose can we not accomplish?

We have no desire to accuse Japan of breaking many solemn treaties since 1836, nor to single out specially the teachers in the schools or government
officials who treat the heritage of our ancestors as a colony of their own, and our people and their civilization as a nation of savages, finding delight only in
beating us down and bringing us under their heel.

We have no wish to find special fault with Japan's lack of fairness or her contempt of our civilization and the principles on which her state rests; we, who
have greater cause to reprimand ourselves, need not spend precious time in finding fault with others; neither need we, who require so urgently to build for
the future, spend useless hours over what is past and gone. Our urgent need today is the settling up of this house or ours and not a discussion of who has
broken it down, or what has caused its ruin. Our work is to clear the future of defeats in accord with the earnest dictates of conscience. Let us not be filled
with bitterness or resentment over past agonies or past occasions for anger.

Our part is to influence the Japanese government, dominated as it is by the old idea of brute force which thinks to run counter to common and universal law,
so that it will change, act honestly and in accord with the principles of right and truth. The result of annexation, brought about without any conference with
the Korean people, is that the Japanese, indifferent to us, use every kind of partiality for their own, and by a false set of figures show a profit and loss
account between us two peoples most untrue, digging a trench of everlasting resentment deeper and deeper the farther they go.

Ought not the way of enlightened courage to be to correct the evils of the past by ways that are sincere, and by true sympathy and friendly feeling make a
new world in which the two peoples will be equally blessed?

To bind by force twenty millions of resentful Koreans will mean not only loss of pence forever for this part of the Far East, but also will increase the ever-
growing suspicion of four hundred millions of Chinese-upon whom depends the danger or safety of the Far East-besides strengthening the hatred of Japan.
From this all the rest of the East will suffer. Today Korean independence will mean not only daily life and happiness for us, but also it would mean Japan's
departure from an evil way and exaltation to the place of true protector of the East, so that China, too, even in her dreams, would put all fear of Japan aside.

This thought comes from no minor resentment, but from a large hope for the future welfare and blessing of mankind. A new era wakes before our eyes, the
old world of force is gone, and the new world of righteousness and truth is here. Out of the experience and travail of the old world arises this light on life's
affairs. The insects stifled by the foe and snow of winter awake at this same time with the breezes of spring and the soft light of the sun upon them.

It is the day of the restoration of all things on the full tide of which we set forth, without delay or fear. We desire a full measure of satisfaction in the way of
liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and an opportunity to develop what is in use for the glory of our people.

We awake now from the aid world with its darkened conditions in full determination and one heart and one mind, with right on our side, along with the forces
of nature, to a new life. May all the ancestors to the thousands and ten thousand generations old us from within and all the force of the world aid us from
without, and let the day we take hold be the day of our attainment. In this hope we go forward.

Three Items of Agreement

1.This work of ours is in belief of truth, religion and life, undertaken at the request of our people, in order to make known their desire for liberty. Let no
violence be done to any one.
2.Let those who follow us, every man, all the time, every hour, show forth with gladness this same mind.
3.Let all things be done decently and in order, so that our behavior to the very end may be honorable and upright."
The 4252nd year of the Kingdom of Korea 3d Month
Representatives of the people.
Son Pyung-Hi
Kil sun-Chu
Yi Pil-Chu
Paik Yong-Sung
Kim Won-Kyu
Kim Pyung-Cho
Kim Chang-Choon
Kwon Dong-Chin
Kwon Byung-Duk
Na Yong-Whan
Na In-Hup
Yang Chun-Paik
Yang Han-Mook
Lew Yer-Dai
Yi Kop-Sung
Yi Mung-Yong
Yi Seung-Hoon
Yi Chong-Hoon
Yi Chong-Il
Lim Yei-Whan
Pak Choon-Seung
Pak Hi-Do
Pak Tong-Wan
Sin Hong-Sik
Sin Suk-Ku
Oh Sei-Chang
Oh Wha-Young
Chung Choon-Su
Choi Sung-Mo
Choi In
Han Yong-Woon
Hong Byung-Ki
Hong Ki-Cho

The inspiration for the Samil Movement came from the repressive nature of Japanese policies under its military administration of Korea following 1905, and
the "Fourteen Points" outlining the right of national "self-determination" proclaimed by President Woodrow Wilson at the Paris Peace Conference in January
1919. After hearing news of Wilson’s speech, Korean students studying in Tokyo published a statement demanding Korean independence.

At 2 P.M. on the 1 March 1919, the 33 nationalists who formed the core of the Samil Movement convened at Taehwagwan Restaurant in Seoul, and read the
Korean Declaration of Independence that had been drawn up by the historian/writer Choe Nam-seon and the poet/Buddhist monk Manhae (also known as
Han Yongun). The nationalists initially planned to assemble at Tapgol Park in downtown Seoul, but they chose a more private location out of fear that the
gathering might turn into a riot. The leaders of the movement signed the document and sent a copy to the Japanese Governor General, with their
compliments.

We herewith proclaim the independence of Korea and the liberty of the Korean people. We tell it to the world in witness of the equality of all nations and we
pass it on to our posterity as their inherent right.
We make this proclamation, having back of us 5,000 year of history, and 20,000,000 of a united loyal people. We take this step to insure to our children for all
time to come, personal liberty in accord with the awakening consciousness of this new era. This is the clear leading of God, the moving principle of the
present age, the whole human race's just claim. It is something that cannot be stamped out, or stifled, or gagged, or suppressed by any means.

They then telephoned the central police station to inform them of their actions and were arrested afterwards.

Despite the nationalists' concerns, massive crowds assembled in the Pagoda Park to hear a student, Chung Jae-yong, read the declaration publicly.
Afterwards, the gathering formed into a procession, which the Japanese police attempted to suppress.

Coinciding with these events, special delegates associated with the movement also read copies of the independence proclamation from appointed places
throughout the country at 2 PM on that same day, but the nationwide uprisings that resulted were also brutally put down by the Japanese police and army.

Protests nevertheless continued to spread, and as the Japanese national and military police could not contain the crowds, the army and even the navy were
also called in. There were several reports of atrocities. In one notable instance, Japanese police in the village of Jeam-ri herded male protesters into a church,
locked it, and burned it to the ground.

Approximately 2,000,000 Koreans had participated in the more than 1,500 demonstrations, many who have been massacred by the Japanese police force
and army. According to the frequently referenced The Bloody History of the Korean Independence Movement  by Park Eunsik, 7,509 were killed, 15,849 were
wounded, and 46,303 were arrested. During March 1 to April 11, Japanese officials reported that 553 people were killed with over 12,000 arrested, while 8
policemen and military policemen were killed and 158 were wounded. Many of those arrested were taken to the infamous Seodaemun Prison in Seoul where
they were imprisoned without trial and tortured. Several hundred people were murdered in extrajudicial killings in the "death house" at the rear of the site.

In 1920, the Battle of Chingshanli broke out in Manchuria between exiled Korean nationalists and the Japanese Army. The March 1st movement resulted in a
major change in Japanese imperial policy towards Korea. Japanese Governor-General Hasegawa Yoshimichi accepted responsibility for the loss of control
(although most of the repressive measures leading to the uprising had been put into place by his predecessors) and was replaced by Saito Makoto. Some of
the aspects of Japanese rule considered most objectionable to Koreans were removed. The military police were replaced by a civilian force, and limited
press freedom was permitted under what was termed the 'cultural policy'. Many of these lenient policies were reversed during the Second Sino-Japanese
War and World War II.

Women also found new opportunities after the movement to express their views for the first time in Korea. Ideas of female liberation were allowed to be
printed after the rebellion. Such journals as the Sin yoja (New Woman) and Yoja kye (Women's World) were printed. The March 1 Movement was a catalyst for
the establishment of the Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea in Shanghai in April 1919 and also gave influence on nonviolent resistance in India
and many other countries.
On May 24, 1949, March 1st was designated a national holiday in South Korea.
III
Movements - 33
Ready Posture - CLOSED READY STANCE C

Pattern Meaning
SAM-IL denotes the historical date of the independence
movement of Korea which began throughout the country on
March 1, 1919. The 33 movements in the pattern stand for the
33 patriots who planned the movement.
SAM-IL
Ready Posture - CLOSED READY STANCE C

1. Slide to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with the forearm.
2. Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a high block to D with the right
double forearm.
3. Move the left foot to D forming a left walking stance toward D while executing a high side block to D with the right
knife-hand and bringing the left palm on the right back forearm.
4. Execute a middle twisting kick to A with the right foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 3.
5. Lower the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle punch to D with the right
fist.
6. Move the right foot on line CD to form a sitting stance toward B while executing a middle wedging block with a
reverse knife-hand.
7. Execute a low thrust to C with a right upset finger tip while forming a left walking stance toward C, pivoting with the
right foot.
8. Execute a high outward block to D with the right outer forearm and a low block to C with the left forearm while
forming a right L-stance toward C pulling the left foot.
9. Move the right foot to C to form a sitting stance toward A while executing a middle wedging block with a reverse
knife-hand.
10. Execute a low punch to C with the right double fist while forming a left L-stance toward C, pulling the right foot.
11. Move the left foot to C forming a left walking stance toward C while executing a high block to BC with a double
arc-hand and looking through it.
12. Move the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a middle punch to C with the left
fist.
13. Move the right foot on line CD to form a right L-stance toward D while executing a low punch to D with the left
double fist.
14. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance toward B while executing a high guarding block to B with a reverse
knife-hand.
15. Execute a U-shape block to B while forming a left fixed stance toward B, slipping the left foot.
16. Execute a sweeping kick to B with the right side sole and then lower it to B forming a right fixed stance toward B
while executing a U-shaped block to B.
17. Jump and spin counter clockwise, landing on the same spot to form a left L-stance toward B while executing a
middle guarding block to B with a knife-hand.
18. Execute a middle side piercing kick to B with the right foot while forming a knife-hand guarding block.
19. Lower the right foot to the left foot and then move the left foot to A forming a left walking stance toward A while
striking the left palm with the right front elbow.
20. Move the right foot to A turning counter clockwise to form a left diagonal stance toward D at the same time
thrusting to C with the left back elbow supporting the left forefist with the right palm and turning the face to C.
21. Execute a pressing block with an X-fist while forming a right walking stance toward AD.
22. Move the left foot to A in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance toward C while executing a W-shape block with
the outer forearm.
23. Execute a middle side piercing kick to A with the left foot while forming a forearm guarding block.
24. Lower the left foot on line A and then execute a low guarding block to B with a knife-hand while forming a left
L-stance toward B, pivoting the left foot.
25. Move the left foot to B forming a right rear stance toward B while executing an upward block with a left palm.
26. Move the right foot to B forming a left rear foot stance toward B while executing a pressing block with a twin palm.
27. Move the left foot to C in a stamping motion to form a left walking stance toward C while executing an upset punch
to C with a twin fist.
28. Move the right foot to C forming a left L-stance toward C while executing a low block to C with the right forearm,
pulling the left fist under the left armpit.
29. Execute a middle punch to C with the left fist while maintaining a left L-stance toward C bringing the right fist over
the left shoulder.
30. Execute a middle front block with the right forearm while forming a left walking stance toward D, pivoting with the
right foot.
31. Execute a high punch to D with the left fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward D. Perform 30 and 31 in a
continuous motion.
32. Execute a low front snap kick to D with the left foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 31.
33. Lower the left foot to D and then move the right foot to D in a stamping motion forming a right walking stance
toward D while executing a high vertical punch to D with a twin fist.
END: Bring the left foot back to a ready posture.